A Look Ahead

Americans have been providing their insights on a wide range of topics as they navigate the reality of COVID-19 and deal with the impacts on their daily lives

June 25, 2020

When do you think life will go back to normal in America?

82%

increase in the number of people who believe life is never going back to normal in America

Bar graph comparing when people thing life will return to normal in America

Compared to other generations, Gen Xers (44%) and baby boomers (42%) are the most likely to believe that life will never go back to normal in the U.S.

Circle chart showing when each generation believe life will return to normal

As states continue lifting restrictions, which places would you feel comfortable visiting in the next 30 days?

Americans are still most comfortable going to the grocery store, as they have been operating safely throughout the outbreak. While restaurants and salons topped the list of places Americans would feel comfortable frequenting back in May, malls and retail stores have bumped salons out of the number three spot. 31% of Americans are not comfortable going to any of these establishments just yet, up from 27% in May. Overall, Americans consistently feel the least comfortable dropping off their children at daycare.

Compared to other age groups...

  • Baby boomers feel the most comfortable going to the grocery store.
  • Millennials feel the least comfortable going to restaurants.
  • The Silent Generation feels the most comfortable going to beauty salons.
Bar graph comparing where each generation feels comforatable going in the next 30 days

May 12, 2020

When do you think life will go back to normal in the United States?

40

of Americans think it will take over 60 days for life to return to normal in the U.S., while 29% are ruling out the possibility of normal altogether. This outlook is far less optimistic than Americans' predictions a month earlier.

A bar graph comparing answers from April 11 to May 11 on when Americans think life will go back to normal

As states start lifting restrictions, which places would you feel comfortable going to in the next 30 days?

Americans report they would feel the most comfortable going to grocery stores (32%) within the next 30 days - likely due to the fact that as essential businesses, grocery stores nationwide have been operating with safety measures in place throughout the outbreak. Overall, Americans feel the least comfortable dropping off their children at daycare (6%), with about 1 in 3 Americans feeling uncomfortable going to any establishments at all.

10% of Americans feel comfortable going to bars
25% of Americans feel comfortable going to restaurants
23% of Americans feel comfortable going to hair and nail salons

Beyond grocery stores, 25% of Americans would feel comfortable going to a restaurant, 23% would visit a hair or nail salon, and only 10% would return to the bars.

A bar graph showing what businesses different generations will head once open

The youngest generations (Gen Z & millennials) will head to bars and gyms when restrictions lift, while baby boomers and adults over 75 are more likely to go to restaurants and salons

May 5, 2020

How comfortable are you with states lifting stay-at-home restrictions and re-opening for business?

As federal social distancing guidelines expire, only 34% of Americans are comfortable with governors lifting stay-at-home restrictions at the state level.

In light of stay-at-home orders, how do you plan to celebrate Mother’s Day this year?

32% Americans plan to celebrate Mother’s Day in person with friends and family, while 27% plan to send a gift to their loved ones.

April 27, 2020

How comfortable are you with states lifting stay-at-home restrictions and re-opening for business?

32

are comfortable with states lifting stay-at-home restrictions

35

approve of protests against stay-at-home orders

Overall, only 32% of Americans are comfortable with states lifting stay-at-home restrictions. Americans in states where restrictions are being lifted are equally as uncomfortable as the rest of the nation.

April 13, 2020

When do Americans think life will go back to normal in the US?

Most Americans don’t believe life in the US is going back to normal any time soon. Compared to baby boomers, Gen Z is far more optimistic when it comes to expectations around the return of normalcy.

A bar graph breaking down when Americans think life will return to normal in the US

Millennials are most likely to question whether life will ever go back to normal at all.

A bar chart breaking down when Americans believe life will go back to normal in the US by generation

Compared to the rest of the U.S. population, millennials are least likely to practice social distancing

A bar graph breaking down how likely different generations are to practice social distancing

See what other insights we've gathered to date

Working from Home Preferences

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FAQs

How is this data collected?

‘Fluent Pulse’ reflects a daily online survey collected across Fluent’s portfolio of owned & operated websites.

Who is the audience?

Fluent attracts a massive audience across its network of owned media properties. While all segments of the US population are represented, the below are our most prevalent demographic skews:

Demographic Attribute Over Penetrated Among
Age Median: 38

61% between the age of 18 & 44

Gender 50/50 Male/Female
Education High School Degree or Some College
Homeownership 61% Renters
Households with Children 42% of Audience

How many people were surveyed?

On average, 150,000 – 175,000 consumers respond daily.

Is the data weighted?

No, but representative of the overall Fluent Audience.

How do you protect consumers data privacy?

All responses related to this survey are anonymized; only survey responses will be disclosed. At no point will consumer’s personal information will ever be disclosed.

What was your methodology?

Data was collected from US adults between March 10 & April 26, 2020 via Fluent’s portfolio of owned and operated media properties. Results are specific to the Fluent audience, and not reflective of the general US population.

The data presented on this site does not reflect the official opinion, policy or position of Fluent, Inc. This research is only meant to inform and illustrate, as an example, the rich data assets Fluent can derive insights from to drive in-market strategies.